Author Topic: Bluesky  (Read 402 times)

Offline N-drju

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Bluesky
« on: September 17, 2017, 06:45:40 AM »
I would like to ask what feature / characteristic of an atmosphere the "Bluesky density" was originally meant to mimic. Getting this value real high has some interesting influence on a sky and the setting or rising sun especially. However, it darkens the ground beyond recognition, making all terrain shapes virtually indiscernible. :-\

How the "bluesky density" should be used? And in conjunction with what featrues in order to keep the ground brighter?
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Offline Dune

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Re: Bluesky
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2017, 09:36:27 AM »
Use only primary, and take a second atmo for secundary may help.
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Offline N-drju

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Re: Bluesky
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2017, 04:20:57 PM »
That's pretty much the same thing. No difference.
"I don't know what 'pokygon' is but I like it."

Offline Oshyan

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Re: Bluesky
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2017, 10:30:10 PM »
Very high values of any atmosphere setting are going to produce strange results. The defaults are "Earth-like normal". I don't know what specific effect Bluesky Density has at  higher values, but it does seem to have some qualities of "Haze" to it along with adding color. Note also that Bluesky Density and Redsky Decay are inextricably linked, so what you may be seeing is the correspondingly very high value of Redsky Decay which seems logical to cause a darkening (because if increased light decay).

- Oshyan

Offline Matt

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Re: Bluesky
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2017, 10:35:19 PM »
Rayleigh scattering.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayleigh_scattering

Rayleigh scattering causes the blue hue of the daytime sky and the reddening of the sun at sunset. As with anything in the atmosphere, it affects the appearance of distant objects - not just the sky - and it affects lighting too.

In Terragen the strength of this effect is controlled by 'Bluesky density'. You can also adjust the additive blue effect (inscattering) independently of the reddening effect (outscattering), using the 'Bluesky additive' and 'Redsky decay' parameters. Doing this will change 'Bluesky horizon colour', by necessity, because that's another way to control the balance between the two.

Matt
« Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 10:37:51 PM by Matt »
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